The Mixed Methods Design Decision Tool (MMDDT) is designed to help to make informed decision about an appropriate mixed methods design for their study. This is just a GUIDE. You may need additional support to choose the right design.

Please click on your answer under each question

  1. What is the sequence of your mixed methods research design?

  1. Concurrent (meaning both qualitative and quantitative data would be collected at the same time)

  2. Sequential (meaning one data would be collected and analyzed before another kind of data is collected

You are more likely to use one of the three sequential designs (i.e. Sequential Explanatory, Sequential Exploratory or Sequential Transformative Mixed Methods Design).

2. Do you want to continue to determine a specific mixed methods design for your study?

  1. Yes, I want to continue

  2. Yes, but I want to start all over

  3. No, I don't want to continue

You are more likely to use one of the three concurrent mixed methods designs (i.e. Concurrent Triangulation, Concurrent Nested or Concurrent Transformative Mixed Methods Design).

3. Do you want to continue to determine a specific mixed methods design for your study?

  1. Yes, I want to continue

  2. Yes, but I want to start all over

  3. No, I don't want to continue

4. What is the purpose of your mixed methods design (i.e what is the rationale of using a qualitative and quantitative method in your study)?

  1. Triangulation: Using different methods to address the same phenomenon

  2. Complementarity: Using different methods to address the different parts of a phenomenon

  3. Development: Using the results of one method to inform the other method

  4. Initiation: Looking for contradictory results and using different method to collect data to explain the discrepancy

  5. Expansion: Using different methods to address the different parts of a phenomenon

If you selected TRIANGULATION, then you are more likely to use a Concurrent Triangulation Mixed Methods Design.

5. Do you want to continue to determine a specific mixed methods design for your study?

  1. Yes, I want to continue

  2. Yes, but I want to start all over

  3. No, I don't want to continue

If you selected INITIATION and plan to use concurrent design, then you are more likely to use a Concurrent Nested or Concurrent Transformative Mixed Methods Design.

6. Do you want to continue to determine a specific mixed methods design for your study?

  1. Yes, I want to continue

  2. Yes, but I want to start all over

  3. No, I don't want to continue

If you selected DEVELOPMENT and your study falls under sequential design, then you are more likely to use a Sequential Exploratory or Sequential Transformative Mixed Methods Design.

7. Do you want to continue to determine a specific mixed methods design for your study?

  1. Yes, I want to continue

  2. Yes, but I want to start all over

  3. No, I don't want to continue

8. Considering the purpose of your study, your research question(s), amount of data needed, do the qualitative and quantitative components, have equal or unequal weight or priority?

If you selected EQUAL PRIORITY and plan NOT to conduct the study from a transformative perspective, then you are more likely to use a Concurrent Triangulation Mixed Methods Design.

9. If the qualitative and quantitative components are unequal, which of them would play a dominant role in your study?

If you selected the QUALITATIVE COMPONENT as dominant and plan NOT to conduct your study from a transformative perspective, then you are more likely to use a Sequential Exploratory Mixed Methods Design.

If you selected the QUANTITATIVE COMPONENT as dominant and plan NOT to conduct your study from a transformative perspective, then you are more likely to use a Sequential Explanatory Mixed Methods Design.

Thank you for using this tool. We hope it was helpful to you.

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References

  • Hanson, W. E., Creswell, J. W., Plano Clark, V. L., Petska, K. S., & Creswell, D. J. (2005). Mixed methods research designs in counseling psychology. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 2(55), 224-235. doi:10.1037/0022-0167.52.2.224

  • Plano Clark, V. P., & Creswell, J. W. (2008). The mixed methods reader. California: Sage Publications, Inc.

  • Creswell, J. W., & Plano Clark, V. P. (2011). Designing and conducting mixed methods research. California: Sage Publications, Inc.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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